A history of death in the Hebrew Bible / Matthew J. Suriano.

By: Suriano, Matthew J [author.]Language: English Publisher: 2018Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press USA, [2018]Description: 296 pagesContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780190844738; 0190844736Subject(s): Bible. Old Testament -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Bible -- Antiquities | Bible | Bible. Old Testament | Bibeln. Gamla Testamentet | Bible -- Criticism, interpretation, etc | Bible -- Antiquities | Palestina (landområde) | Palestine -- Social life and customs | Middle East -- PalestineGenre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc.Additional physical formats: Online version:: History of death in the Hebrew Bible.DDC classification: 220.8/3069 LOC classification: BS1199.D34 | S87 2018Other classification: Cc Online resources: Online access for Lund University Oxford Scholarship Online (Religion) | Tillgänglig för användare inom Uppsala universitet Oxford Scholarship Online Religion Abstract: The meaning of the afterlife in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is studied through the ideals of a good death, beginning with burial customs. This book uses burial remains from Iron Age Judah to shed important light on the images of death found in biblical literature. Postmortem existence in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament was rooted in mortuary practices and conceptualized through the embodiment of the dead. But this idea of the afterlife was not hopeless or fatalistic, consigned to the dreariness of the tomb. The dead were cherished and remembered, their bones were cared for, and their names lived on as ancestors. This book examines the concept of the afterlife in the Hebrew Bible by studying the treatment of the dead, as revealed both in biblical literature and in the material remains of the southern Levant. The mortuary culture of Judah during the Iron Age is the starting point for this study. The practice of collective burial inside a Judahite rock-cut bench tomb is compared to biblical traditions of family tombs and joining one's ancestors in death. This archaeological analysis, which also incorporates funerary inscriptions, will shed important insight into concepts found in biblical literature such as the construction of the soul in death, the nature of corpse impurity, and the idea of Sheol. In Judah and the Hebrew Bible, death was a transition that was managed through the ritual actions of the living. The connections that were forged through such actions, such as ancestor veneration, were socially meaningful for the living and insured a measure of immortality for the dead.
Item type Current library Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Huvudbestånd Biblioteket
220.8 Ex1 Checked out 25/06/2021 26273006114

Includes bibliographical references and index.

The meaning of the afterlife in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament is studied through the ideals of a good death, beginning with burial customs. This book uses burial remains from Iron Age Judah to shed important light on the images of death found in biblical literature. Postmortem existence in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament was rooted in mortuary practices and conceptualized through the embodiment of the dead. But this idea of the afterlife was not hopeless or fatalistic, consigned to the dreariness of the tomb. The dead were cherished and remembered, their bones were cared for, and their names lived on as ancestors. This book examines the concept of the afterlife in the Hebrew Bible by studying the treatment of the dead, as revealed both in biblical literature and in the material remains of the southern Levant. The mortuary culture of Judah during the Iron Age is the starting point for this study. The practice of collective burial inside a Judahite rock-cut bench tomb is compared to biblical traditions of family tombs and joining one's ancestors in death. This archaeological analysis, which also incorporates funerary inscriptions, will shed important insight into concepts found in biblical literature such as the construction of the soul in death, the nature of corpse impurity, and the idea of Sheol. In Judah and the Hebrew Bible, death was a transition that was managed through the ritual actions of the living. The connections that were forged through such actions, such as ancestor veneration, were socially meaningful for the living and insured a measure of immortality for the dead.