A better hope : resources for a church confronting capitalism, democracy, and postmodernity / Stanley Hauerwas.

By: Hauerwas, Stanley, 1940-Language: English Publisher: Grand Rapids, Mich. Brazos Press, ©2000Description: 288 pages 23 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 1587430002; 9781587430008Subject(s): United States | United StatesGenre/Form: | Additional physical formats: Online version:: Better hope.DDC classification: 261/.0973 LOC classification: BJ1275 | .H36 2000Other classification: 11.62 | 241 | Cga Online resources: Cover image
Contents:
On being a Christian and an American -- The Christian difference: or, surviving postmodernism -- Resisting capitalism: on marriage and homosexuality -- Christian ethics in America (and the Journal of religious ethics): a report on a book I will not write -- Walter Rauschenbusch and the saving of America -- Not late enough: the divided mind of Dignitatis humanae personae -- Only theology overcomes ethics: or, what "ethicists" must learn from Jenson -- Why The politics of Jesus is not a classic -- Why time cannot and should not heal the wounds of history, but time has been and can be redeemed -- Worship, evangelism, ethics: on eliminating the "and" -- Enduring: or, how Rowan Greer taught me how to read -- Captured in time: friendship and aging (with Laura Yordy) -- Sinsick -- McInerny did it: or, should a pacifist read murder mysteries? -- Appendix: the Ekklesia Project: a declaration and an invitation to all Christians.
Review: "With A Better Hope, Stanley Hauerwas concentrates on the constructive case for the truth and power of the church and its faith, "since Christians cannot afford to let ourselves be defined by what we are against. Whatever or whomever we are against, we are so only because God has given us so much to be for."" "Hauerwas here crystallizes and extends profound criticisms of America, liberalism, capitalism, and postmodernism, but also identifies unlikely allies (such as Chicago Archbishop Francis Cardinal George) and locates surprising resources for Christian survival (such as mystery novels). Interlocutors along the way include Reinhold Niebuhr, John Courtney Murray, and, in a significant and previously unpublished essay, social gospeller Walter Rauschenbusch."--Jacket.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Huvudbestånd Biblioteket
261 Ex 1 Available 1670045947

Includes bibliographical references (pages 217-281) and index.

On being a Christian and an American -- The Christian difference: or, surviving postmodernism -- Resisting capitalism: on marriage and homosexuality -- Christian ethics in America (and the Journal of religious ethics): a report on a book I will not write -- Walter Rauschenbusch and the saving of America -- Not late enough: the divided mind of Dignitatis humanae personae -- Only theology overcomes ethics: or, what "ethicists" must learn from Jenson -- Why The politics of Jesus is not a classic -- Why time cannot and should not heal the wounds of history, but time has been and can be redeemed -- Worship, evangelism, ethics: on eliminating the "and" -- Enduring: or, how Rowan Greer taught me how to read -- Captured in time: friendship and aging (with Laura Yordy) -- Sinsick -- McInerny did it: or, should a pacifist read murder mysteries? -- Appendix: the Ekklesia Project: a declaration and an invitation to all Christians.

"With A Better Hope, Stanley Hauerwas concentrates on the constructive case for the truth and power of the church and its faith, "since Christians cannot afford to let ourselves be defined by what we are against. Whatever or whomever we are against, we are so only because God has given us so much to be for."" "Hauerwas here crystallizes and extends profound criticisms of America, liberalism, capitalism, and postmodernism, but also identifies unlikely allies (such as Chicago Archbishop Francis Cardinal George) and locates surprising resources for Christian survival (such as mystery novels). Interlocutors along the way include Reinhold Niebuhr, John Courtney Murray, and, in a significant and previously unpublished essay, social gospeller Walter Rauschenbusch."--Jacket.